Not into Scrapping, Check out Journal 10+

I know people who love to scrap.  They have bins filled to the brim with rubber stamps, themed paper and stickers that say things like “Reminisce” and “Fun in the Sun.”  They save ticket stubs and invitations and host and attend scrapping gatherings with their scrapping friends where they’ll sit in a circle and use those zigzag scissors as they preserve memories.  And while I love the idea of women gathering in the name of marking history, because of my aversion to clutter, of the perfectionist in me who knows scrapping in a satisfying way would eat up too much of my too-little time,  and of my thinking that scrapping isn’t cool enough for the hip mom identity I’m shamelessly trying to develop, I will never be a scrapper. 

Still, I know it’s important for Lucy to have some of her milestone and not-so-important moments captured, not only because one’s personal history shapes who he or she is, but also because I don’t want my daughter accusing me of being a neglectful parent which is what my little brother has done to our mother.  He’s the youngest of three and his baby book — besides having his name and birthdate written in it — is literally empty, while our older brother’s book details every item he received for his first three birthdays.  But I diverge.  
Two months before I got pregnant my former boss introduced me to the Journal 10+.  Its slogan is “The Journal for Busy People,” and it’s the perfect moment catcher for busy moms (and dads!).  This one very reasonably sized journal will hold over 10 years of our memories from the mundane (“Rainy Tuesday. Read a lot of books to Lucy and did lots of laundry.”) to the life-changing (“Took a pregnancy test and it was positive!”) to the proactive (“Joined Weight Watchers online.  Need to do something about these last eight pounds.”).  There’s only four lines per day so I don’t feel pressured to write much, and there’s plenty of overflow space for when you need to tell the whole story like the time a biker in NYC spit in my face when I opened the passenger side of a car door to get out without checking for oncoming cyclists. Oops.  I’ve also used the overflow space to tape in pictures from Lucy’s ultrasound and Max Ehrmann’s “Desiderata” (maybe I am a scrapper at heart).  Plus, since I’m in the second year of keeping it, it’s fun to write in it right before my husband and I go to bed and ask him to guess what happened exactly a year ago.  
There’s a happy medium between full-fledged scrapper and memory-deprived characters in Lois Lowry’s The Giver.  (Although it’s a young adult novel, The Giver should be read by people of all ages.  It brilliantly presents some important questions about memories and history.  But I diverge.  Again!)  I know parents must choose wisely how they spend their time.  If you’re like me and scrapping seems like the ultimate time suck, then take five minutes each day to capture some family moments via the Journal 10+ or any other way that’s doable for you.  It’s a worthy endeavor, at least that’s what I hope Lucy thinks when I eventually pass my journal of memories onto her.  

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